Skip to main content
Add Me To Your Mailing List

Promoting the art and craft of wood turning in the greater Cincinnati area

                                                                                        

 

HomeFeatured Turning

Featured Turning


Some turnings deserve a bit of recognition. This page will feature a turning (roughly every week) selected from the Show & Tell pieces. The selection is arbitrary and at the discretion of the webmaster. Feel free to suggest turnings for this page but publication is not guaranteed. The turner will be asked to write a short description of the piece before publication.




Cocobolo Box by John Shannon


This is an end-grain lidded box that I made for the 2017 Symposium auction.  It is 2.75” (h) x 2.5” (w) and turned from cocobolo using the process/sequence popularized by Richard Raffan. The main challenge in boxes like these is to get a nice fitting lid.  

This box has a very slightly loose or slip-fit lid, which allows the base of the box to remain on the table when the top is removed. Slip-fit is a style advocated by Jimmy Clewes instead of the suction-fit often favored by woodturners. He believes that women, who are often the recipients of turned boxes, prefer not having to use two hands to open the box (btw my wife agrees with him).  

I like dressing up some of my boxes with contrasting inlays in the top. In this case I used a nice piece of big leaf maple burl left over from making a guitar head plate. The finish is multiple coats of gun-sprayed nitrocellulose lacquer that were level-sanded and buffed.

John


Posted 10/26/2017



Open segmented egg by Ray Feltz

I call it a trade blanket egg because of the pattern. It is approx. 2.7" high by 2" dia.  there are a total of 2056 pcs. The solid bands are 16 segments. The green one is dyed holly  The open segmented layers have 56 pieces  in each.


Ray

Posted 9/9/2017




Segmented Sphere by Terry Elfers
6" diameter


My "Curve Ball" is 6" in diameter. It started as an assortment of 18 boards of various species and thicknesses. After stacking and gluing them together, I cut them into 3/8" thick disks. I ran them thru the drum sander, both sides to end up with about 1/4" thickness. I glued them together again, rotating each disk slightly from the one below it.

I turned this cylinder between centers to approximate a ball and then used my ball jig to make it a perfect sphere. Sanding was accomplished utilizing a vacuum chuck.


This little project required the use of every power tool in my shop ! The biggest challenges were obtaining perfect glue joints without any gap, and maintaining the exact rotation until the glue set up.


I have several more curve balls in the works and am considering making a hollow ball.

Terry



Posted 6/25/2017






Spindle Geometry by Robert C Henrickson

{Beech and fumed white oak}

Approximately 14" x 9" x 9"

                    

Large spindle-based lattice screens first inspired my interest in turning; geometric patterns and structures have long intrigued me. Though the screens are two-dimensional, those concepts and geometric patterns adapt nicely to three-dimensional work.

 

Despite the potential number of pieces involved (thirty in this case), duplication is a minor problem; story sticks aid uniform layout. The major challenges are planning the sequential interlocking of pieces, and drilling holes in the right places at the correct angles, to allow the final assembly. Although precision would seem necessary, a bit of "slop" provides some wiggle room essential during the assembly.

 

This is the latest in a series of spindle constructions exploring two- and three-dimensional geometry and incorporating nested forms. In this case two tetrahedra (triangular pyramids with four triangular faces and four vertices) are joined base to base. The midpoints of each face are connected to form triangles; these together yield an octahedron (8 faces and 6 vertices) nested within each tetrahedron.

 

Contrasting woods highlight and differentiate the patterns formed by the various components.

 

Posted 6/6/2017




The “Trash Can” Vase by John Glessner
approx. 2" x 6"

 

Made from walnut with a padouk and cherry segmented inlay.

The turning was then cast with Alumilite resin and hollowed exposing resin and making the piece translucent.

 

This vase started with an idea: Could I make a hollow form that had some segmented features that didn’t require precise fit up as the surrounding area would be filled with resin?

 

The design was inspired by a welded metal sculpture that hangs on the wall in our house. It features thin steel strips welded in a wave pattern that looks like an electronic signal. This sits on top of a mottled green background. My wife affectionately calls this sculpture “trash can” art as the harsh welded steel pieces in it reminds her of metallic cans (yes, you can guess which one of us bought that piece!)

 

I “borrowed” that idea but instead of steel I glued wedges of different woods into an over-sized turned groove mimicking the “trash can” pattern. The wedges were cut to different lengths and widths and assembled somewhat randomly gluing up with CA glue. I left space in the groove for the resin to fill. It was cast in two steps, first the green color, then grooves turned and the gold stripes were cast in. After final turning and hollowing it was finished with CA glue polished to a gloss.

John

Posted May 18, 2017







Multi Axis turning by Arn Ward
Approx. 1-1/2" dia x 7" tall

This funky looking piece is a Wood Sprite box.  The lidded box is turned on four axis, two for the base and two for the lid. There is a wood sprite living inside it (no really, you have to remove the lid to see him!)  The box is turned from walnut and has a Danish oil finish.

Arn

Posted 5/5/17












Segmented turning by Lowell Converse
Approx. 12" dia x 8" tall

This is the second attempt at a new process I call brick construction. Each layer of the vessel must have the correct outside angle and near exact diameter for the overall shape to be right. Thus each segment edge length must be +/- 1/64". The angle and segment length are tablesaw challenges. Then before gluing up the rings, each segment is chamfered on 4 sides and then dyed or bleached. Once the rings are glued they are stacked and glued one at a time with position and orientation critical, as there is no going back and the overall form is done. And there can be no glue squeeze out or it will show in the finished piece. Next the inside and base are turned round. On this, a one piece lid was turned, carved, the grooves burned,  and dyed to match the vessel. Note the knob on top is 6 sided lost wood.


Lowell
Posted 4/19/2017



 
OVWG Learning Center is located at Kennedy Heights Cultural Campus
6620 Montgomery Road, Kennedy Heights, OH  45213 


The entrance to our studio is on the South side of the building, by the loading dock area.

Click here for map --->     Click here for a picture of the entry door to our studio---> 

 
 
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

OVWG is proud to be one of 350+ worldwide chapters of the American Association of Woodturners
 
We encourage you to join this fine organization.
The American Association of Woodturners (AAW) is an international, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.
            AAW's mission is to provide education, information, and organization to those interested in turning wood.